White-Collar Crime and Other Business-Related Crimes

Introduction

White-collar crimes are highly prevalent in business organizations and most institutions that handle human resources due to their non-violent nature and ambiguity. Although most people who engage in white-collar crimes do it for profit, white-collar crimes have become a menace because of several other reasons. Compared to blue-collar crimes which are perpetrated on a limited number of victims by individuals who associate with low social status, white-collar criminals enjoy a higher social status, thus giving them a feeling of power and invincibility. Nevertheless, their actions have far-fetched implications for individuals and populations. The following paragraphs discuss the concept of white-collar crimes, their implications, and recommendations to limit their advancement.

Causes of white-collar crimes

Personal gains and profits are the main reasons why wealthy individuals and people in authority commit white-collar crimes. However, these crimes constitute unethical practices that go against business and institutional standards, meaning that their perpetrators disregard industry ethics, company values, and the well-being of their institutions. Therefore, they carry out these violations anonymously while believing that they will not get caught (Piquero, 2018). On the other hand, some people do not acknowledge the implications of their actions on the business organization and individuals obtaining services from the institution. Hence, they neglect their duties towards the organizations and the people they serve, allowing them to commit business-related crimes. Moreover, some individuals hold powerful leadership positions in organizations, thus providing an incentive to commit these crimes. Thus, it is crucial to acknowledge these factors as facilitators of white-collar crimes.

Implications of white-collar crimes

White-collar crimes have more adverse implications on the economy and the status of the community than ordinary crimes. White-collar crimes are committed at a higher level of the economic chain. Therefore, they can interfere with the financial stability and viability of an organization. In addition, they can endanger employees and limit their morale and motivation by facilitating unsafe working environments (Piquero, 2018). Similarly, they can pose ethical dilemmas in the workplace since they might obligate employees to become accomplices, especially in cases where top officials and leaders are involved. In addition, white-collar crimes can be injurious to consumers as they may allow the production of dangerous products and condone acts like environmental pollution. Therefore, it is reasonable to adopt strategies to prevent white-collar crimes in organizations.

Solutions to prevent white-collar crimes in organizations

A reliable solution to preventing white-collar crimes in institutions is role differentiation. Some individuals are tasked with critical decision-making responsibilities and job obligations that allow them to handle vast resources. However, assigning different management roles to individuals can ensure that they collaborate in decision-making and are accountable for all their actions (Lord & Van Wingerde, 2019). In addition, it is necessary to create awareness among staff members and leaders about the negative impact of white-collar crimes. Moreover, setting up reporting channels, evaluation strategies, and occasional auditing can enable shareholders in organizations to note gaps and address issues before they escalate. Similarly, it is critical to take strict action against white-collar criminals to discourage the habit.

Conclusion

White-collar crimes are highly destructive due to the powerful positions of individuals responsible for violations. Additionally, they can go undetected for long periods and sometimes may never be revealed. Nevertheless, all white-collar crimes have negative implications, regardless of their density. Apart from posing risk to employees and the organization, white-collar crimes are disastrous to society. However, acknowledging the existence of white-collar crimes and developing strategies to limit these crimes by creating awareness and establishing stern rules or reparations can help organizations slowly eradicate the vice.

References

Lord, N., & Van Wingerde, K. (2019). Preventing and Intervening in White‐Collar Crimes: The Role of Law Enforcement. The Handbook of White‐Collar Crime, 246-261.

Piquero, N. L. (2018). White-collar crime is crime: Victims hurt just the same. Criminology & Pub. Pol’y, 17, 595.

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LawBirdie. (2023, June 6). White-Collar Crime and Other Business-Related Crimes. Retrieved from https://lawbirdie.com/white-collar-crime-and-other-business-related-crimes/

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LawBirdie. (2023, June 6). White-Collar Crime and Other Business-Related Crimes. https://lawbirdie.com/white-collar-crime-and-other-business-related-crimes/

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"White-Collar Crime and Other Business-Related Crimes." LawBirdie, 6 June 2023, lawbirdie.com/white-collar-crime-and-other-business-related-crimes/.

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LawBirdie. (2023) 'White-Collar Crime and Other Business-Related Crimes'. 6 June.

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LawBirdie. 2023. "White-Collar Crime and Other Business-Related Crimes." June 6, 2023. https://lawbirdie.com/white-collar-crime-and-other-business-related-crimes/.

1. LawBirdie. "White-Collar Crime and Other Business-Related Crimes." June 6, 2023. https://lawbirdie.com/white-collar-crime-and-other-business-related-crimes/.


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LawBirdie. "White-Collar Crime and Other Business-Related Crimes." June 6, 2023. https://lawbirdie.com/white-collar-crime-and-other-business-related-crimes/.